Elaine Dalpiaz Vice President

Elaine Dalpiaz is Vice President for Health Systems and Strategic Partnerships at First Focus on Children. Elaine has more than twenty-five years of advocacy and policy experience, having worked on Capitol Hill, in federal agencies, and for local and national non-profit organizations. Elaine has been a champion for women, children, and families throughout her career.

Prior to joining First Focus, Elaine worked at AARP where she supported state offices in advocating before Congress on national campaigns to prevent the repeal of the Affordable Care Act and to lower prescription drug prices. She led an initiative to support AARP state offices in advocating for long-term care legislation and crafted federal and state strategic plans for long-term care and Medicaid expansion. Elaine also directed a “kitchen cabinet” of select AARP state office directors in determining state and national advocacy priorities.

On Capitol Hill, Elaine worked for Senator John Glenn (D-OH) and Senator Blanche Lincoln (D-AR) in their personal offices to support federal programs serving women, children, and families. Elaine participated in the development of the Stewart McKinney Homeless Act, the first comprehensive piece of legislation to address various aspects of homelessness. As a professional staff member of the Senate Special Committee on Aging for Senator John Breaux (D-LA), Elaine directed hearings and legislative activity on long-term services and supports, the Older Americans Act, Medicaid, and prescription drugs. She was also successful in crafting two earmark proposals for aging-related projects through the appropriations process.

Her executive branch experience includes time as a program officer for the Administration for Children and Families at the Department of Health and Human Services, serving as the Deputy Director of the 1995 White House Conference on Aging, and as the Director of Communications for the National Senior Service Corps, part of the Corporation for National Service.

A highlight of her career was overseeing the development of Kidspace, the first daycare center in Washington, DC for homeless children and families, sponsored by The House of Ruth.

Elaine received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Walsh College in North Canton, Ohio and her Master’s Degree in Comparative Social Policy from the London School of Economics in London, England. Elaine is originally from Ohio and resides in Arlington, VA with her husband and two sons.

Resources by Elaine Dalpiaz


Issue Brief: Behavioral Health Parity For Children

| September 14, 2022 |

What Is Behavioral Health Parity? Treating mental health conditions and substance use disorders as equivalent to other health conditions in insurance plans is what


Fact Sheet: The High Cost of Prescription Drugs & the Impact on Children

| August 3, 2022 |

Background Americans pay nearly double, and sometimes triple, the cost of prescription drugs compared to other industrialized nations. Children are not immune to this


Issue Brief: The Need to Incorporate Children, Youth, and Adolescents into State 988 Systems

| July 14, 2022 |

States are currently in the process of implementing the 988 National Suicide Hotline Designation Act, passed by Congress and signed into law in October


Fact Sheet: Mental Health & Kids

| April 8, 2022 |

Children and teens in our country are experiencing a mental health crisis. Even before the pandemic, this crisis was severe, with 1-in-5 children under


Fact Sheet: Removing the “Family Glitch” from the ACA

| January 27, 2022 |

On December 10, 2021, the Biden Administration took a positive step toward fixing the “family glitch,” which impacts the ability of over 5 million


What’s at stake for kids if Congress doesn’t pass Build Back Better

| December 22, 2021 |

As negotiations have stalled and the fate of the Build Back Better Act hangs in the balance, children stand to lose access to monthly


Policy Brief: 10 Ways to Improve the Health Coverage of America’s Children

| November 10, 2021 |

While much progress has been made in health care coverage for children, there is still more to do to ensure that the more than